The Introspective Nature of Architecture

By: Marryiam Niazi

    April showers bring may flowers. Here at Twist Gallery, they also bring concrete and glass. We kicked this rainy weather off by showcasing our much-awaited installation series, called Cityscapes.

    Toronto is the fourth largest city in North America, behind New York and Los Angeles. This city is a diverse hub of people from all walks of earth. The different neighborhoods of Toronto vary by their cultural distinctions, commercial investments and gourmet delights. The link between all areas of Toronto is the strong architecture that connects the city. In an attempt to explore this common thread, Twist Gallery decided to put Toronto’s architecture up for public introspection.

 

  Artwork from The Toronto Sunrise Series Collection by Taku Kumabe

Artwork from The Toronto Sunrise Series Collection by Taku Kumabe

  Marzena Kotapska`s vibrant acrylics of Toronto capture its energy and people

Marzena Kotapska`s vibrant acrylics of Toronto capture its energy and people

 

     The artists featured in Cityscapes are fellow Torontonians. They have a first-person account of what the city feels and looks like. These urban dwellers have channeled the inspiration from architecture into art. This is no easy process. It involves hours of observation, people watching and deep introspection. These steps are just the beginning. The next step in their work involves carving out hours of isolates time slots, gathering materials/resources and making art out of architecture. In doing so, they have managed to provide Twist Gallery patrons with visible nuances and perspectives on the same city.

    Our Cityscapes exhibit includes a mix of art styles. Kotapska’s version of Toronto is colorful and energetic scenes of the city in motion. Meanwhile, Lorie Slater prints her city on metal. Her pictures are a more jagged edged perspective on the fast-paced realities of city life. One of the pieces that seems commonplace, yet very significant is the image of a subway station car (Finch Car). Many people associate architecture only with buildings. However, architecture is not just stationary shelter. In her collection, Slater argues that moving objects ( streetcars, subway trains etc) are equally important and connected to large infrastructure. In fact, one might even refer to them as “Connecting Architecture”.

  King & Bay Streetcar, Lori Slater

King & Bay Streetcar, Lori Slater


 

TWIST GALLERY invites you to come check out your city, from a fresh pair of eyes. Cityscapes runs for the full month of April. We want to hear what you have to say. After all, it is YOUR CITY!