"Restoration" Artist Spotlight: Conversations with Tyler R. Lambert

“Say you’re just walking down the street, you’ve done it 20 times over and, yet, there is this little tiny shop that has something in the window that you’ve never taken notice to. If you stop for a minute and actually look at it, you might realize what that is, how you feel about that and you might become curious about it. Like an old clock in an apartment. Everything has a story to it. More so about appreciation I guess.” - Tyler R. Lambert

The Heart of Nova Scotia by Tyler R. Lambert

The Heart of Nova Scotia by Tyler R. Lambert

What was your inspiration behind this collection?

This show, in particular, is about realizing what we lost. The art in the city closely mimics the city, its more modern, a lot of stainless steel and colt whites, pretty colors basically. My exhibit is an attempt at bringing something cozy to the city again, a modern twist, especially in the still life. To bring something old to a new era I suppose, to give them a different view on what it is that is around them. Encouraging people to slow down and appreciate, not necessarily historical things but everyday objects.

Morning at Stone Hill by Tyler R. Lambert

Morning at Stone Hill by Tyler R. Lambert

How long did it take you to complete this painting? 

It took me about a month, working on and off. Janette, that’s her English name, caught my eye, so I wanted to do her justice. This is taken from a photo.

You can tell how humble she really was by looking at her photographs and since she was also loved by everybody,  I wanted to capture that in the painting while also, leave a mark on whoever is looking at it.

The dress is beautiful, the hat hung down, as if, for whatever reason, she decided not to wear.

Geneviève Lantelme by Tyler R. Lambert

Geneviève Lantelme by Tyler R. Lambert

What can you tell me about this painting? 

It’s literally the perfect representation of a family, something that has been forgotten. It represents the idea of passing something down through generations.

As simple as a mother showing her two young daughters something she learned from her own mother. It’s like hearing that story your grandmother tells you every time you go visit. About the time she met your grandfather, that love affair they had, how they made them feel. 

It is also sad to do these paintings because these people no longer exist and nobody knew who they were. They are not in history books, they are just regular people. A photograph is one thing but to turn it into a painting to show the world… is entirely a different story.

A Mother’s Touch by Tyler R. Lambert

A Mother’s Touch by Tyler R. Lambert

Do you listen to music while working? If yes, what kind?

Always actually. In the odd time, I will indulge in something a little more electric, from the 90s, a little bit of Offspring but for the most part its classical. Something to relax, like a  concerto or a duet between a piano and a violin; there is nothing else that sounds quite like a piano or a violin playing together. 

The fluctuation, the high notes the low notes, give you ideas I suppose. Especially when I’m doing a sky, a whimsical tree just blowing around without direction.

Even the sun. Something light-hearted. Something by perhaps Bach. Everybody’s heard of stereotypical classical music that everybody plays but if you sit down and actually listen to it, and think of nothing else you’ll feel something stirring inside of you, lifting up and slowing down,  easing its way out…

A Quiet View by Tyler R. Lambert

A Quiet View by Tyler R. Lambert

What does your creative space look like? 

Some days, a complete disaster but I tend to keep it quite clean. If you were to step into my house or my studio, you’d be stepping back about 250 years. I have a great appreciation for antiques, old harvest tables and beautiful frames giant shelves. Think of a Renoir sort of studio, fabric strewn about on hooks, odds and ends of knick-knacks on shelves and stuff like that. Everything catches the eye. A few isles, set up in three corners and a  very big desk that holds all my materials. There are a few overhead lights, one would be for the isles, but a couple more are just for aesthetic reasons, like a stain glass lamp and an old library lamp that I use at my desk. Imagine an old library, that’s basically what it would look like, with bookshelves everywhere. 


What does  a day in your life look like? 

First and foremost, 5 am everyday. I love my mornings. I used to be a night person because a lot of creative people work at night, its peaceful and relaxing. I used to be the same way till I kept waking up after 4 hours and try to start my day.

Mornings are the best time for art because your mind is blank. Nothing is on your mind, you’re just relaxing especially if you take about 20 minutes just to sit and reflect on the day ahead of you.

I usually have something on the go and pick up where I left off. Maybe I’ll do a little bit of this tree over here or I’ll do this duck over there… and so on. Then I move on to different sections, until I  go into town or out on business. So that’s basically rinse and repeat every single day. 

Untitled by Tyler R. Lambert

Untitled by Tyler R. Lambert