toronto art

Meet Gloria Blatt!

What inspires your art?

My inspirations come from nature and the natural beauty around us. I’ve always been able to view the world through a lens of colour, shapes, and dimensions, and have the ability to translate this into artistic expression.

“Wings” acrylic on birch (30” x 40”) $1,500

“Wings” acrylic on birch (30” x 40”) $1,500

Can you talk about your process? What tools do you use to create?

I begin my creations by imagining abstract renditions of images in my mind that have been formed through my life experiences. At times I even surprise myself when the process seems to take on a life of its own. I take advantage of a variety sources of mediums and continually experiment with innovative techniques. Some of my work is done with conventional paint and brush, and at other times they can involve my fingers and other non-conventional tools.   

Source: www.gloriablatt.com

Source: www.gloriablatt.com

When did you first discover art? Are you self-taught or did you go to school for it?

For as long as I remember, I have been fascinated by artistic expression. I attended formal study both at York University in the Fine Arts program, and Ontario College of Art and Design. York University provided me with a deep appreciation of art history, while OCAD allowed me the freedom to express myself in an incredibly innovative, fearless manner.

What is your personal goal as an artist?

My goal as an artist is first and foremost to be proud of my creations and share my passion for the craft with as many people as possible. It gives me incredible satisfaction when others are able to derive pleasure from my creations and discover their own life-story in my work.  

“Freeze” acrylic, oil, ink, enamel on birch, wood float frame (30”x 30”) $1,300

“Freeze” acrylic, oil, ink, enamel on birch, wood float frame (30”x 30”) $1,300

How do you title your artworks? 

The process of naming my art is often a reflexive response to the creation. It is always spontaneous and natural as my art always conveys a strong personal message.

Do you have a particular piece that has a special connection to you?

Of all of my paintings, the one that is closest to my heart is one inspired by my children, my greatest creations.

“Dragon” acrylic, ink, oil on birch, wood float frame, (30”x 30”) $1,300

“Dragon” acrylic, ink, oil on birch, wood float frame, (30”x 30”) $1,300

Who are some of your favourite artists?

Having studied art history and having visited many world-famous galleries, I am awe struck and overwhelmed by the works of Picasso, Monet, Modigliani, Chagall, and Miro (although my list could go on).  

What is it like to be an artist in today’s world?

Being an artist is both maddening and transformative, as I serve as my harshest critic.  At the same time, the creative process allows me to escape into a state of inner peace and tranquility.

“Dusty Rose” acrylic on stretched canvas, (42.5”x 51”) $2,500

“Dusty Rose” acrylic on stretched canvas, (42.5”x 51”) $2,500

What are you passionate about?

In today’s troubled world, being an artist affords me the ability to remain optimistic and inspired.

What does “Energy” mean to you?

Energy is the life force that I derive from my family and friends, and that ultimately manifests in my artistic expression in the form of colour and movement.

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this one Toronto! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

 And since you’re here, check out the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

 To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

 Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

Meet Jessica Robbins!

What inspires your art?

In a word: colour. I know that sounds simplistic, but I thrive on bright and bold colours. I love colour and look for it everywhere! I take photos of anything that catches my eye, whether it's traveling or simply day-to-day life, and get a lot of ideas for colour palettes from life. My process can also be very collaborative. The majority of the pieces I have created have been special requests. While working with a patron may seem to allow for less freedom, it is so flattering to be asked (and trusted) to paint something so personal for someone. It pushes me out of my comfort zone and produced some of my best work.

“Magnificent Mile” acrylic on canvas (20”x 20”) $300

“Magnificent Mile” acrylic on canvas (20”x 20”) $300

Can you talk about your process? What tools do you use to create?

I work with acrylics primarily because they allow for the bright, bold colour palettes with which I love to work. While mostly brush work, I like to experiment with different tools and techniques to add variety to my work. Especially when working on abstract pieces, I use palette knives to layer paint in different ways and then add washes of colour to help unify everything on the canvas. Almost no brushes are used in the making of the abstract pieces in the show!

“Jaxx” acrylic on canvas, courtesy off Jessica Robbins.

“Jaxx” acrylic on canvas, courtesy off Jessica Robbins.

When did you first discover art? Are you self-taught or did you go to school for it?

I always loved art class in school. I had such a passion I knew I wanted to make it my life. I studied Fine Art (and Law) at the University of Guelph and was able to experiment with so many different mediums. In school I worked mostly in sculpture, wood working, metal works, plaster mold making, I love using my hands. Painting came a bit later, but it is where I found myself. Friends started asking for small pieces (my first few requests were dog portraits) and over the past six years I have been able to work at my own pace and really refine my style. I am also a high school art teacher and am so lucky to be able to share my passion with my students and be surrounded by something I love every day!

Jessica Robbins

Jessica Robbins

What is your personal goal as an artist?

At the beginning of 2019, my goal was to work towards an exhibition in a public space. Getting the show at Twist was a huge accomplishment for me. Moving forward, I would love to continue to work towards more shows in the GTA and creating pieces for a solo exhibition. One of my pieces for "Energy" is a streetscape of Kensington Market and I would like to work towards a series of similar pieces inspired by different neighbourhoods around the city. Toronto has such a rich diversity of architecture which lends itself very generously to artwork.

“Kensington” acrylic on canvas (24”x 48”) $850

“Kensington” acrylic on canvas (24”x 48”) $850

Do you have a particular piece that has a special connection to you?

I loved working on Kensington. The colours, the inherent culture, the vibrancy - everything about the neighbourhood shouts "Energy". I really wanted to showcase this in my painting and am happy with the result. My artistic collection of work varies from portraits to abstract pieces, but this was the painting that tied everything together. I used this piece as the focal point for my show as I am most proud of it.

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss out on this exhibition Queen West! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

Meet Elena Dinissuk!

Elena Dinissuk is a painter who works out of her home studio in Mississauga, ON. Elena has always felt like an artistic soul; she took to painting later in life, and is constantly working on perfecting her technique. Elena’s main medium is acrylic. She likes acrylic due to its vibrancy and versatility. She started by painting landscapes inspired by Ontario’s outdoors, and has since branched out to abstract works. This has taken her to a new direction. 

“Sunlight Through a Foggy Forest” acrylic on wood, (12”x 16”) $220

“Sunlight Through a Foggy Forest” acrylic on wood, (12”x 16”) $220

Elena uses acrylic gels and modeling paste to add opaque and transparent layers, as well as texture, to her work. Her style is distinct and memorable, with paintings containing movement, flow and positive energy. Elena enjoys painting by palette knife (pictured below), and teaches her technique to art schools when invited.

A palette knife (source: Pexels)

A palette knife (source: Pexels)

Elena is proud to say that she’s been participating in art shows and exhibits since 2017. Both her landscapes and abstract works have been featured in juried exhibitions. Elena has twice participated in the prestigious Paint Ontario, at the Lambton Heritage Museum. She later went on to be included in the Impact 2018 Juried Show and Overzealous 2018, both at Neilson Park Creative Centre in Etobicoke. Elena has also been included in group gallery shows in Propeller Gallery, and Artusiasm Gallery. She has also participated in art shows in Mississauga, and in Riverdale Artwalk 2019.

Elena with her work. You can follow her @lenadv_ art and #lenadv_ art

Elena with her work. You can follow her @lenadv_art and #lenadv_art

Elena strives to promote joy and peace through her work, while making people think and feel.

Dinissuk’s latest collection at Twist!

It highlights air, water, and earth elemental energy! The earth energy is warm and grounding, the water energy is rejuvenating, and the air energy is clean and fresh. 

“My paintings are inspired by landscapes. Sometimes I incorporate all three of these elements, sometimes I concentrate on only one.”

-Elena Dinissuk

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this fantastic exhibition! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

 

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

 

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

 

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

3 Tips for Hanging a Painting

So, you’ve just fallen in love with a piece of art you’ve seen in your local art gallery. You know that it would be the PERFECT addition to your home, so you pass through and buy it. The gallery director puts a little red sticker on it, signifying that this particular piece is spoken for; its dance card is full. Now comes the hard part: waiting for the exhibition to be over, so you can proudly display your new cherished treasure. But how should one display art? There must be rules to follow or a guideline? Sort of. Below are Twist Gallery’s 3 Tips for Hanging a Painting. Enjoy!

🎨 🎨 🎨

 3 TIPS FOR HANGING A PAINTING

🎨 Hang a painting by its focal point.

Every piece of art is exceptional and different. Art tells unique stories, boasts diverse triumphs and impacts viewers individually. Therefore, it’s your job; nay your duty, scratch that; your privilege to decide where the art’s focal point is located. Essentially, the focal point, is where the viewer’s eye is naturally drawn. Often times, this is the centre of the painting, however many artists play with asymmetry in space and varying scale. So, what does that mean? It’s up to you! You fell in love with this painting for a reason. Where does your eye naturally fall on the canvas? This part of the painting should be hung level with your eye. 

For instance, check out this vivid piece by Sandra Di Leo below.

Figure 1 “Rebel” by Sandra Di Leo; 30 X 40 acrylic on canvas; $2,100

Figure 1 “Rebel” by Sandra Di Leo; 30 X 40 acrylic on canvas; $2,100

At Twist, we’ve been debating where one’s eye instinctively falls on Di Leo’s work. Some follow the curves of the powerful black lines reaching rest inside the circular shapes. However, other eyes tend to focus on the bright colours, especially the electrifying greens and glowing pinks. Wherever you decide the focal point is located, it should be hung close to eye level. 

 

🎨 Carefully think about lighting the artwork. 

 

Lighting can be tricky, especially if you don’t have track mounted lights at your home. You want to avoid direct sunlight because it can be very damaging to surfaces. Try to mount the art in a room with lots of natural indirect light. Also, you’ll want to give your artwork even light. This is why many gallery’s mount works on walls with numerous light sources to ensure an even amount of light bathing the canvas. Lastly, consider the type of light (if not natural light). Fluorescent light is awful for dramatic art.  You’d be wise to stick with bulbs and light sources that replicate soft daylight. For example, take a glance at Courtney Senior’s “Where the Magic Happens”.

Figure 2 “Where the Magic Happens” by Courtney Senior; 48 x 48 acrylic on canvas; $2,000

Figure 2 “Where the Magic Happens” by Courtney Senior; 48 x 48 acrylic on canvas; $2,000

As the bright colours shatter and splinter apart revealing the strong dark tones of the background, Senior’s expression is fully realized. A robust piece such as this requires a room full of indirect light. Any direct sunshine or incandescent light would overwhelm the already strong colour pallet presented. 

 

🎨 Group pieces of art together for dramatic effect.

When you are decorating a space, consider how several paintings can work together. Perhaps the canvas’ were created by the same artist and represent similar thematic elements or feelings? Conversely, this can work when the paintings are dissimilar. Imagine the contrast and complication to viewers by pairing pieces that clash or challenge each other. Can you think of a time when artistic elements clashed so strongly that the effect was incredibly profound and memorable? After all, art is about expression and creativity. Ultimately, it's up to you. Consider the work of Elena Dinissuk featured next.

Figure 3 “Beach Tranquility” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 3 “Beach Tranquility” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 4 “Flying Over the Ocean” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 4 “Flying Over the Ocean” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

These two pieces compliment and accent each other. The wild and energetic ocean waters of the first painting is referenced by the same blue hues in the second. Furthermore, viewers regard the land and sky embodied with oranges and pale blues in the second painting. This only highlights the lack of land in the first painting. As viewers begin to consider both paintings simultaneously, they see elements that are repeated and elements that exists individually. Dinissuk’s work instigates an exciting story of the majestic mighty ocean and our beautiful planet.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed reading our 3 tips for hanging a painting. And if you think we’ve missed anything, please comment below and let us know your tips. We’d also love to hear from anyone who has purchased from Twist Gallery in the past. How did you hang your art? Share a picture on Instagram and remember to tag us! @twistgalley 

 

And since you’re here, why not check out the other artists in our Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Keep us in your focal point by following us @Twistgallery and @TwistGallery!





Toronto: Art is who we are

Written by: Aleksandra Kaliszuk

The City of Toronto has a diverse identity, thriving in arts and culture. Toronto is home to 66% more artists than any other Canadian city. This is directly reflected in the numerous galleries, local eateries, museums and startups that make the city so interesting; the opportunities to create and experience art are everywhere! Toronto hosts 80 film festivals, is home to 10 city owned museums, 200 professional internationally known performing arts organizations, and hosts numerous annual events that support art culture, such as Nuit Blanche, Doors Open Toronto and Cavalcade of Lights. Such attractions and events contribute to the city’s sense of involvement and community. Toronto celebrates local talent and often showcases it throughout the city; there are more than 200 city owned public art works and historical monuments located throughout the city contributing to the generally urban landscape. There are often new installations appearing in new spots throughout the city, such as the annual Waterfront BIA exhibitions of lakefront art (up until February 25, 2018); encouraging city dwellers to pause hibernating during this cold season and explore.

Retrieved from torontolife.ca

The plethora of cultural hubs and attractions in downtown Toronto make it easy for seemingly anyone to find something they are interested in experiencing or pursuing. Annually, Toronto’s cultural economy contributes approximately $11.3 billion to the city’s GDP, which is more than the energy, agriculture, mining, and forestry industries contribute combined!

Most attractions such as museums, galleries, and artistically driven neighbourhoods are located in and around the downtown core, such as the West Queen West BIA (coincidently where Twist Gallery is located) making it a desirable area for many tourists and Torontonians to visit. These areas are also home to some of the city’s most recognizable, and photogenic works of graffiti and street art created by local artists such as Ben Johnston, Kellen Hatanaka, and Arturo Parada (also known as DUROTHETHIRD).  Each of their works can be seen along Queen Street West, extending the charm of Queen Street’s infamous Graffiti Alley to other areas of downtown. Their work brightens up our city by adding colour and artistic flare while keeping it from becoming a boring concrete jungle. No wonder Queen Street West was noted as one of the hip-est streets on the globe in 2014 by Vogue Magazine!

Retrieved from westqueenwest.ca

Being part of the city, we at Twist Gallery, love to support the community and local artists. Our April group exhibit will do just that: support local artists and showcase Toronto cityscapes through their unique perspectives.

 

Art: How it Benefits Everyone

Written by Aleksandra Kaliszuk

Art is good for you! Yes, you read that right. The process of creating or experiencing art, whether it be a painting, music, writing, you name it, has positive benefits on one’s psychological well being! Engaging in a creative activity will result in ample health benefits.

Distraction From Everyday Life

Art is a great way to get distracted from that crazy daily routine. We are all constantly bombarded with information and notifications. Taking a moment (or two) to slow down and create something is a great way to unwind and get distracted from all those responsibilities and tasks you've been thinking about all day.

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

Stress Relief

Its no secret as to why art and creativity are used as a form of therapy. Research has shown that the right kind of art can affect a hospital patients’ well being by stimulating their brain, taking their mind off their worries and decreasing their stress levels! Art is a form of meditation, and is used to nonverbally express emotions. So yes, go buy yourself that adult colouring book you were eyeing!

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

Sense of Accomplishment

Creating something, anything, will trigger an individual’s sense of accomplishment. Feeling accomplished, could result in an increase in self esteem and happiness. Be proud of what you create!

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

Problem Solving

By creating art, you challenge your imagination and ability to continue working on a project, making mistakes and facing potential obstacles. This can promote personal growth and problem solving skills which can be reflected in various situations in your life.

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

Critical Thinking

Creating and experiencing art can help develop critical thinking skills that can be applied in all areas of one’s life. A recent study at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Northwest Arkansas found that students that were taken to the museum improved their ability to think critically! Other benefits of visiting the museum included historical empathy and a sparked interest in art museums.

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

There is evidently a relationship between creativity, individual development and healing. So create something beautiful or visit a gallery… Art is for everyone!

Instagram @twistgallery

Instagram @twistgallery

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN PUTTING ON A GALLERY EXHIBITION

Who knew so much went into planning an exhibition when making the artwork was hard enough in itself? Unfortunately putting on exhibition is more than simply printing photographs and framing them onto the wall but never fear, we have complied a small list of things for you to consider before displaying your lovely work!

1.     THE LIGHTING

It is important to consider the type of the lighting your work will be placed under. If you have fairly warm tones in your photograph and it is placed under tungsten or natural lighting, this could create an overall warm tone to your photograph that you may not want. It is key to view the space beforehand and colour balance your work to fit the lighting accordingly or bring in additional lighting as needed. Windows will also affect lighting and mixing different colour temperatures can cause an odd colour balance. Remember, the photographs will appear darker and less vibrant once printed than on your computer screen so it is always good to make multiple test prints!

2.     HOW TO DISPLAY IT

There is more than one way to exhibit your work than simply hanging it on a wall. You can use magnets to create a seamless and borderless look or use frames for a geometric structure but be sure to consider the reflection on top of the glass! The artwork could be tethered to wire and suspended from the ceiling or at the top of a wall to appear as if floating.  Depending on what surface you choose to print or paint onto such as a fabric, it can then be folded and draped across a wall. Light boxes are also a unique and innovative way to display photographs that further illuminate and intensify the details of the images.

3.     TYPES OF SURFACES

Depending on the type of surface your work is printed or painted on, the texture could create an unwanted appearance. Glossy paper is going to be highly reflective once a light is shone on it, however it makes coloured images look more vibrant and lively. Matte paper can appear quite flat and cause photographs to loose depth. It is always good to print on multiple surfaces and bring them into the gallery space to see how the look under the lighting. You could also print on: metal, wood, fabrics or glass; the possibilities are endless.

4.     SEQUENCING

If you’ve created a body of work that all flows and connects with one another, consider how they will be placed and sequenced on the wall. You can place the images chronologically as if to tell a story or if the images do not necessary belong together, they can be grouped by colour or content. Sequencing is important to keep in the back of your mind when arranging the images. Try to think as a viewer walking into the gallery and where their eyes will travel first and carry through onto the next image. How do you want the work to be observed? Be sure to leave space between each piece to allow it to be observed solely on its own or keep them together if you wish to create a different affect.

We hope these tips and tricks have given you some things to consider when planning your next exhibition! You can always draw inspiration from other galleries to see how they display their work or call on other artists for assistance and opinions. Best of luck!