art

Meet Jessica Robbins!

What inspires your art?

In a word: colour. I know that sounds simplistic, but I thrive on bright and bold colours. I love colour and look for it everywhere! I take photos of anything that catches my eye, whether it's traveling or simply day-to-day life, and get a lot of ideas for colour palettes from life. My process can also be very collaborative. The majority of the pieces I have created have been special requests. While working with a patron may seem to allow for less freedom, it is so flattering to be asked (and trusted) to paint something so personal for someone. It pushes me out of my comfort zone and produced some of my best work.

“Magnificent Mile” acrylic on canvas (20”x 20”) $300

“Magnificent Mile” acrylic on canvas (20”x 20”) $300

Can you talk about your process? What tools do you use to create?

I work with acrylics primarily because they allow for the bright, bold colour palettes with which I love to work. While mostly brush work, I like to experiment with different tools and techniques to add variety to my work. Especially when working on abstract pieces, I use palette knives to layer paint in different ways and then add washes of colour to help unify everything on the canvas. Almost no brushes are used in the making of the abstract pieces in the show!

“Jaxx” acrylic on canvas, courtesy off Jessica Robbins.

“Jaxx” acrylic on canvas, courtesy off Jessica Robbins.

When did you first discover art? Are you self-taught or did you go to school for it?

I always loved art class in school. I had such a passion I knew I wanted to make it my life. I studied Fine Art (and Law) at the University of Guelph and was able to experiment with so many different mediums. In school I worked mostly in sculpture, wood working, metal works, plaster mold making, I love using my hands. Painting came a bit later, but it is where I found myself. Friends started asking for small pieces (my first few requests were dog portraits) and over the past six years I have been able to work at my own pace and really refine my style. I am also a high school art teacher and am so lucky to be able to share my passion with my students and be surrounded by something I love every day!

Jessica Robbins

Jessica Robbins

What is your personal goal as an artist?

At the beginning of 2019, my goal was to work towards an exhibition in a public space. Getting the show at Twist was a huge accomplishment for me. Moving forward, I would love to continue to work towards more shows in the GTA and creating pieces for a solo exhibition. One of my pieces for "Energy" is a streetscape of Kensington Market and I would like to work towards a series of similar pieces inspired by different neighbourhoods around the city. Toronto has such a rich diversity of architecture which lends itself very generously to artwork.

“Kensington” acrylic on canvas (24”x 48”) $850

“Kensington” acrylic on canvas (24”x 48”) $850

Do you have a particular piece that has a special connection to you?

I loved working on Kensington. The colours, the inherent culture, the vibrancy - everything about the neighbourhood shouts "Energy". I really wanted to showcase this in my painting and am happy with the result. My artistic collection of work varies from portraits to abstract pieces, but this was the painting that tied everything together. I used this piece as the focal point for my show as I am most proud of it.

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss out on this exhibition Queen West! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

Meet Tanmay Upadhyaya!

Who is Tanmay Upadhyaya?

Source: @tanmay.art

Source: @tanmay.art

“I'm a Toronto based marketer, passionately in love with colours. My venture into the joys of merging colours with canvas only began very recently. I look forward to seeing where this new voice for expression will lead. I enjoy creating abstract art - using acrylics primarily - and try to evoke a sense of beauty and inspiration through the interactions between colours as they find their place on the canvas. I endeavour to create pieces that produce the same passion for colours in others that I have always felt.”

What are you passionate about?

“54 Shades of Happiness”, acrylic on canvas (32 x 48”), $600

“54 Shades of Happiness”, acrylic on canvas (32 x 48”), $600

I LOVE LOVE LOVE colours. They make me happy, energize me and inspire me. My lifelong love for colours started quite early in my childhood. I grew up in a culture that is very colour-centric and that affected my sensibilities in the most positive way. My work on display at Twist Gallery screams COLOUR. I have employed bold, vibrant colours in a congrous manner, laid on the canvas using non-traditional painting tools. All my pieces also explore order in chaos. There is a sense of controlled randomness.”

What does ‘Energy’ mean to you?

“And a Very Good Evening to You Too Mr. Rothko”, acrylic on canvas (32 x 48”), $600

“And a Very Good Evening to You Too Mr. Rothko”, acrylic on canvas (32 x 48”), $600


“Energy, to me, is the invigorating power of colours. Colours have immense transformative powers and are capable of affecting our moods and general well being. I hope that my work is able to channel this energy and help people feel the joy.”


Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this fantastic exhibition! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

Meet Courtney Senior!

Meet Courtney Senior!

Source: Courtneyseniorart.com

Source: Courtneyseniorart.com

A Bit About Me

“I am a self-taught abstract artist located in Toronto, Canada. 

“Ever since I was little I would immerse myself in creative activities - from colouring and drawing to painting and writing. Despite my passion for the arts, as I got older it took a backseat to sports. 

“While I was in university, I experienced several years of severe anxiety, which led me back to art. It seemed to be the only thing that would ease my angst and bring my mind back to serenity. 

“As my anxiety subsided and as I pursued my career in marketing, painting was pushed to the sidelines again; that is until my late-20’s when I lost my father in a sudden accident and went through very difficult life changes. From that moment on, I spent every free minute I had painting. I used it as an opportunity to put all of the emotions I couldn't express verbally into a form that helped my grieve and ultimately helped me heal. 

“I created so many pieces of artwork that my condo quickly became a studio. At first, selling my work did not seem like an option. I didn't know where to start, it seemed like a scary road of trying to figure out where to sell, how to market myself, pricing, shipping, packaging etc. 

“Whatever Comes Next” acrylic on canvas (48”x 36”) $1,475

“Whatever Comes Next” acrylic on canvas (48”x 36”) $1,475

“And I wasn't in it for the money. I loved creating and loved sharing it with people. So, I thought why not just give it away? But as a marketer, I knew I should come up with something that made more of an impact, had some longevity could be tracked

“I initiated a social project called #ArtandFound. I would neatly package up my work with a note on the outside that read: Hello, I'm an original abstract painting in need of a loving home. FREE ART #ArtandFound.

“I would also leave a note on the inside saying who I was, what the painting was about and contact information for anyone who wanted to follow up with me. I would leave them around different neighbourhoods in the city and hope that someone would pick them up. The response was so incredible that eventually it gave me the confidence to open an Etsy shop. 

“The first day I posted my work, someone purchased a painting! I was overwhelmed with excitement and I haven't looked back since. That was 5 years ago and I still spend every spare minute I have painting and building my business.”

  • Courtney Senior

“Where the Magic Happens” acrylic on canvas (48”x 48”) $2,000

“Where the Magic Happens” acrylic on canvas (48”x 48”) $2,000

“What seems like serendipitous movement is actually a reflection of life – it’s the journey of making bold decisions, connecting with your inner renegade and embracing the highs and the lows and everything in between.”

Courtney


“Forget About the Pretty Things”

“This collection looks beyond first sight. It’s not about the beautiful colours or about matching trendy decor. It’s my introspection of life. Through the lens of synesthesia, I use movement to capture experiences, relationships and moments no matter how profound or mundane. This is my interpretation of life and trying to find beauty, meaning and mindfulness in both the simplicities and complexities of daily life.

“Cosmic Horizon – 03” acrylic on canvas (36”x 48”) $1,475

“Cosmic Horizon – 03” acrylic on canvas (36”x 48”) $1,475

Thoughts on Energy?

“Energy is the essence of all of my work. The energy I embody from daily experiences, musings, encounters etc. is exactly what I am trying to convey through movement on canvas, no matter what the source.”

  • Courtney Senior

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this wonderful exhibition!

Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

 

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

 

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

 

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!






Meet Elizabeth "Ela" Szymczak!

Our exhibit, Energy, has a special place in Ela’s heart, quite literally. She started painting late last year after suffering a heart attack at 48 years old. This event jolted her onto a new life trajectory that includes a special focus on art. 

Ela’s Heart

She bravely took fear from this traumatic experience and used it to facilitate a new love and appreciation for life. For her, energy translates to life. While inspiration sometimes comes to her in dreams, her paintings always exude pure, raw emotion. 

“Catharsis” acrylic on canvas (30”x 40”) $750

“Catharsis” acrylic on canvas (30”x 40”) $750

While she hates talking about herself, her art does the speaking for her. Her piece, “Catharsis” illustrates a purge from repressed emotions and the subsequent relief created through this expression. The deep yet bright red oscillating lines seem to call to the lines created on a heart rate monitor. This new heartbeat is painted over the dark background, representing the new life created out of trauma. The thick textures create dimension, making the piece come to life, much like she did. It hangs on the wall with her other works seemingly radiating from it and creates a storyboard on the gallery wall for her experiences.

“Energy to me is life. All my paintings are driven by pure emotion. Some have come to me in dreams. I really don’t know how else to explain it. It’s raw emotion.”

- Elizabeth “Ela” Szymczak

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this rest of this amazing collection! Be sure to visit Twist at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest exhibits. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

Meet Elena Dinissuk!

Elena Dinissuk is a painter who works out of her home studio in Mississauga, ON. Elena has always felt like an artistic soul; she took to painting later in life, and is constantly working on perfecting her technique. Elena’s main medium is acrylic. She likes acrylic due to its vibrancy and versatility. She started by painting landscapes inspired by Ontario’s outdoors, and has since branched out to abstract works. This has taken her to a new direction. 

“Sunlight Through a Foggy Forest” acrylic on wood, (12”x 16”) $220

“Sunlight Through a Foggy Forest” acrylic on wood, (12”x 16”) $220

Elena uses acrylic gels and modeling paste to add opaque and transparent layers, as well as texture, to her work. Her style is distinct and memorable, with paintings containing movement, flow and positive energy. Elena enjoys painting by palette knife (pictured below), and teaches her technique to art schools when invited.

A palette knife (source: Pexels)

A palette knife (source: Pexels)

Elena is proud to say that she’s been participating in art shows and exhibits since 2017. Both her landscapes and abstract works have been featured in juried exhibitions. Elena has twice participated in the prestigious Paint Ontario, at the Lambton Heritage Museum. She later went on to be included in the Impact 2018 Juried Show and Overzealous 2018, both at Neilson Park Creative Centre in Etobicoke. Elena has also been included in group gallery shows in Propeller Gallery, and Artusiasm Gallery. She has also participated in art shows in Mississauga, and in Riverdale Artwalk 2019.

Elena with her work. You can follow her @lenadv_ art and #lenadv_ art

Elena with her work. You can follow her @lenadv_art and #lenadv_art

Elena strives to promote joy and peace through her work, while making people think and feel.

Dinissuk’s latest collection at Twist!

It highlights air, water, and earth elemental energy! The earth energy is warm and grounding, the water energy is rejuvenating, and the air energy is clean and fresh. 

“My paintings are inspired by landscapes. Sometimes I incorporate all three of these elements, sometimes I concentrate on only one.”

-Elena Dinissuk

Energy at Twist

Don’t miss this fantastic exhibition! Be sure to visit us at 1100 Queen Street West and check out our newest artists featured. Our doors are open every Tuesday to Saturday from 11am till 6pm.

You can call us at (416) 588 - 2222 or email your questions and inquiries to info@twistgallery.ca.

 

And since you’re here, why not browse the Twist Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

 

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

 

Follow us @Twistgalleryand @TwistGallery!

3 Tips for Hanging a Painting

So, you’ve just fallen in love with a piece of art you’ve seen in your local art gallery. You know that it would be the PERFECT addition to your home, so you pass through and buy it. The gallery director puts a little red sticker on it, signifying that this particular piece is spoken for; its dance card is full. Now comes the hard part: waiting for the exhibition to be over, so you can proudly display your new cherished treasure. But how should one display art? There must be rules to follow or a guideline? Sort of. Below are Twist Gallery’s 3 Tips for Hanging a Painting. Enjoy!

🎨 🎨 🎨

 3 TIPS FOR HANGING A PAINTING

🎨 Hang a painting by its focal point.

Every piece of art is exceptional and different. Art tells unique stories, boasts diverse triumphs and impacts viewers individually. Therefore, it’s your job; nay your duty, scratch that; your privilege to decide where the art’s focal point is located. Essentially, the focal point, is where the viewer’s eye is naturally drawn. Often times, this is the centre of the painting, however many artists play with asymmetry in space and varying scale. So, what does that mean? It’s up to you! You fell in love with this painting for a reason. Where does your eye naturally fall on the canvas? This part of the painting should be hung level with your eye. 

For instance, check out this vivid piece by Sandra Di Leo below.

Figure 1 “Rebel” by Sandra Di Leo; 30 X 40 acrylic on canvas; $2,100

Figure 1 “Rebel” by Sandra Di Leo; 30 X 40 acrylic on canvas; $2,100

At Twist, we’ve been debating where one’s eye instinctively falls on Di Leo’s work. Some follow the curves of the powerful black lines reaching rest inside the circular shapes. However, other eyes tend to focus on the bright colours, especially the electrifying greens and glowing pinks. Wherever you decide the focal point is located, it should be hung close to eye level. 

 

🎨 Carefully think about lighting the artwork. 

 

Lighting can be tricky, especially if you don’t have track mounted lights at your home. You want to avoid direct sunlight because it can be very damaging to surfaces. Try to mount the art in a room with lots of natural indirect light. Also, you’ll want to give your artwork even light. This is why many gallery’s mount works on walls with numerous light sources to ensure an even amount of light bathing the canvas. Lastly, consider the type of light (if not natural light). Fluorescent light is awful for dramatic art.  You’d be wise to stick with bulbs and light sources that replicate soft daylight. For example, take a glance at Courtney Senior’s “Where the Magic Happens”.

Figure 2 “Where the Magic Happens” by Courtney Senior; 48 x 48 acrylic on canvas; $2,000

Figure 2 “Where the Magic Happens” by Courtney Senior; 48 x 48 acrylic on canvas; $2,000

As the bright colours shatter and splinter apart revealing the strong dark tones of the background, Senior’s expression is fully realized. A robust piece such as this requires a room full of indirect light. Any direct sunshine or incandescent light would overwhelm the already strong colour pallet presented. 

 

🎨 Group pieces of art together for dramatic effect.

When you are decorating a space, consider how several paintings can work together. Perhaps the canvas’ were created by the same artist and represent similar thematic elements or feelings? Conversely, this can work when the paintings are dissimilar. Imagine the contrast and complication to viewers by pairing pieces that clash or challenge each other. Can you think of a time when artistic elements clashed so strongly that the effect was incredibly profound and memorable? After all, art is about expression and creativity. Ultimately, it's up to you. Consider the work of Elena Dinissuk featured next.

Figure 3 “Beach Tranquility” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 3 “Beach Tranquility” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 4 “Flying Over the Ocean” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

Figure 4 “Flying Over the Ocean” by Elena Dinissuk; 24 x 24 acrylic on wood; $500

These two pieces compliment and accent each other. The wild and energetic ocean waters of the first painting is referenced by the same blue hues in the second. Furthermore, viewers regard the land and sky embodied with oranges and pale blues in the second painting. This only highlights the lack of land in the first painting. As viewers begin to consider both paintings simultaneously, they see elements that are repeated and elements that exists individually. Dinissuk’s work instigates an exciting story of the majestic mighty ocean and our beautiful planet.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed reading our 3 tips for hanging a painting. And if you think we’ve missed anything, please comment below and let us know your tips. We’d also love to hear from anyone who has purchased from Twist Gallery in the past. How did you hang your art? Share a picture on Instagram and remember to tag us! @twistgalley 

 

And since you’re here, why not check out the other artists in our Artist Showcase? CLICK HERE.

To see what’s Upcoming at Twist Gallery CLICK HERE.

Keep us in your focal point by following us @Twistgallery and @TwistGallery!





150 Years of Canadian Art

Written By: Simran Birk

Canada is short of its 150th birthday in a few weeks. Over a century of development and progress has ranked Canada among the highest in international measurements of government transparency, civil liberties, quality of life, economic freedom, and education. However, Canada’s progress and flourishment in cultural and artistic movements should also be acknowledged and recognized.  Let us recount Canada’s finest artists from the past century and half.

It is important to start this article with recognizing and celebrating indigenous art. Indigenous art is an important part of Canadian art as it describes a history and culture that has been established in Canada for centuries. It should also be acknowledged that the word ‘Canada’ is believed to originates from the St. Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata, meaning "village" or "settlement". Bill Reid is a renowned Haida artist who specializes in jewelry, sculpture, screen-printing, and paintings. His work has can be found in various galleries and museums across Canada. An important accomplishment of Reid’s is that two of his sculptures, Raven and the First Men and Spirit of Haida Gwaii, are prominently featured on the $20 Canadian note from 2004 to 2012.

Bill Reid,  Spirit of Haida Gwaii, 1986

Bill Reid, Spirit of Haida Gwaii, 1986

Another aboriginal artist that deserve recognition for their artistic work is Rebecca Belmore. Belmore specializes in installations and performance pieces. Belmore is especially important as her piece’s addresses history, voice and voice-lessness, place, and identity. Belmore work incorporates art, history, and politics to create a truly impactful piece of work. Some of Belmore accomplishments include the 2013 Governors General Awards as well as being the first aboriginal woman representing Canada at the Venice Biennale in 2005.

Rebecca Belmore

Rebecca Belmore

Moving on to other artists who have influenced the Canadian art scene, the Group of Seven is a name that is known by many Canadians. The Group of Seven is a group of artists who specialized in painting Canadian landscape during the early 20th century. The group originally consisted of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley. The Group of Seven is best known for initiating a national art movement in Canadian art. The Group traveled across Canada, depicting its varying landscapes in a new perspective, that gained popularity among Canadian society.

Emily Carr is name that is often associated with the group of Seven and Canadian artists. Although Carr was not officially member of the group, she was closely associated. Carr is known for being one of the first artist to adopt a Modernist and Post-Impressionist painting style. Initially, Carr’s work is focused on indigenous culture and art. However, there is an evident shift to landscape paintings later in her life, when she became involved with the Group of Seven. Carr is an important figure in Canadian art history as she broke and changed the customary representational form of landscape paintings by painting the landscape and spirit of Canada in a modern style. Carr’s life and work is recognized through the many Canadian art institutions named in her honor and the various galleries and museums that hold her work.

Emily Carr,  The Indian Church,  1929

Emily Carr, The Indian Church, 1929

The late 20th century and early 21st century art scene has also been impacted with various artists from different movements and mediums. One group that should be mentioned is the media based artists, General Idea. General Idea was an active art group from 1967 to 1994, that is made up of artists Felix Partz, Jorge Zontal and AA Bronson. General Idea’s work specialized in the twisting forms of popular mass media culture, such as beauty pageants, television talk shows and trade fair pavilions into unconventional media forms. These forms would include postcards, posters, balloons etc. General Idea’s later work addresses the AIDS crisis’s, spreading awareness of this disease through various projects. General Idea’s accomplishments include being featured in the Museum of Modern Art and the National Gallery of Canada.

A.Y. Jackson,  Red Maple,  1914

A.Y. Jackson, Red Maple, 1914

General Idea,  AIDS,  1988

General Idea, AIDS, 1988

Canada’s art scene is much like the country; incredibly diverse with passion and culture. The artists in this article are a few of the many who contribute to Canadian art.  However, it is important to understand that art in Canada is influential and impactful in various ways; whether its making a statement about politics or bringing awareness to a disease, art always has a purpose. With Canada’s 150th birthday coming up, it is important to not only celebrate the birth of this great nation but also to recognize it many accomplishments throughout the years, whether it be in science, culture or art.

ABUSING COPYRIGHT JUST AIN’T RIGHT

By: Lauren Ali

Three years ago, artist Richard Prince caused one of the biggest stirs in the art world with his exhibition entitled, New Portraits. In the project, he screenshotted and printed Instagram posts of celebrities and random teenagers that he then proceeded to sell for $900,000 a piece. Prince has been known in the past for violating previous copyright laws by reproducing other artists work but this project really created a stink. Perhaps it was the fact that the pieces sold for $900,000 and these people in the photographs who originally posted them on Instagram got no credit or portion of the sale. Or maybe because the project lacked creativity and Prince selectively printed sexualized photographs of women while adding unsettling comments underneath them. In all fairness, some people who had their images blown up were simply flattered by having been noticed by the photographer and to have been featured in the exhibition. However, this whole situation leads back to the main issue of copyright.

 

Instagram’s copyright laws state:

 

“Instagram does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service. Instead, you hereby grant to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service, subject to the Service’s Privacy Policy, available here http://instagram.com/legal/privacy/, including but not limited to sections 3 (“Sharing of Your Information”), 4 (“How We Store Your Information”), and 5 (“Your Choices About Your Information”). You can choose who can view your Content and activities, including your photos, as described in the Privacy Policy.”

In a nutshell, it means you have the right to what you post on Instagram and you own the copyright to those images. It also states that by choosing to post on Instagram, you do not surrender your rights and ownership to those photos and anyone wishing to copy or reproduce them requires your permission. Although, it is also important to note that when you post content on the platform that it is solely your content or you have obtained the permission to post it.  

 

Initially, Prince didn’t alter the physical image at all besides deleting some comments and adding his own caption underneath it. Some could argue he didn’t appropriate the entire image since he changed the comments so it wasn’t the exact same image as before. It’s difficult to dictate what does and doesn’t qualify as copyright since it is so simple to get around the already established but rarely followed laws. When in doubt or fear of having your working being stolen, remember to upload the images at a lower resolution and add watermarks over the content. Certain websites can prevent the copying and pasting of images unless they are given proper consent by the artist. If you want to repost or reproduce, remember to contact the artist asking for their permission first! It is hard to remain truthful and original with the work that people are producing nowadays with social media circulating images every second of every day, who is to say they didn’t think of an idea first? But remember, being an artist has many challenges so it’s important to respect your fellow person and their work.

What do you think of Richard Prince’s controversial exhibition? Do you believe that what he did was an appropriation of art or he was simply taking advantage of an opportunity? Let us know below!

 

 

Priceless Art; Five Most Expensive Artworks Ever Sold.

Written by Simran Birk

It is an ironic statement, priceless art; when in fact most Van Gogh’s or Picasso's pieces are sold in the millions. So how can be art be referred as priceless if there is often a selling price. The idea that famous works of art are considered priceless, is the result of the inflating value of the artwork overtime. When a museum or private buyer acquire the infamous artworks of Warhol or Da Vinci, there is no reason to sell the work for it will always be considered valuable. With time, these pieces will be worth more than what was invested. Therefore, essentially they are considered priceless due to its exponentially increasing worth.

What classifies a ‘priceless’ work of art. The title of the most expensive artwork is shared between, Willem de Kooning, Interchange and Paul Gauguin Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?). Each were purchased at 303 million and now inhabit a museum or the collections of private buyer.

Paul Gauguin,  Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?) , 1892

Paul Gauguin, Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?), 1892

Willem de Kooning,  Interchange, 1955

Willem de Kooning, Interchange, 1955

Paul Cézanne, The Card Players is the third most expensive piece of art. It was sold at a 256 million to the Royal Family of Qatar. The fourth most expensive piece of art sold is Jackson Pollock, Number 17A which sold at 202 million to a private buyer.

Paul Cézanne,  The Card Players , 1894–1895

Paul Cézanne, The Card Players, 1894–1895

Jackson Pollock,  Number 17A , 1948

Jackson Pollock, Number 17A, 1948

Finally, the fifth most expensive piece of artwork ever sold is No. 6 (Violet, Green and Red) by Mark Rothko. It was purchased by Dmitry Rybolovlev in a private sale for 188 million.

Mark Rothko,  No. 6 (Violet, Green and Red) , 1951

Mark Rothko, No. 6 (Violet, Green and Red), 1951

The value of art is a subjective matter; as cliché as it sounds, one mans garbage is another’s treasure. It is believed that Van Gogh had only sold one painting in his whole life; however, he is now considered a prominent figure in the world of art and his work is worth millions. This demonstrates that the value of art is ever changing. However, it is evident that the most valuable art is one whose intensity and expression has the power to impact the emotions of another. That is truly priceless art.